My Personal Job Search Stats

Recently I met up with Bryan Chaney to discuss my job search and to just hang out. Bryan and I have known each other for about two years both professionally and personally initially meeting on Twitter. He has been a great sounding board for me and offering constant support during my current search. At one point in our conversation I had told him that I am utilizing all avenues and so far it didn’t really seem like one source or approach had an advantage over another. He seemed a little surprised and asked me if had I really looked at my data. I told him that I had not reviewed it in depth but was keeping a mental track record and constantly reviewing my notes. I had started a spreadsheet at the beginning of my search and stopped after the first five opportunities fell through. It was tough to look at “my losses” and being reminded of them on a daily basis. After talking with Bryan I knew it was now time to try and test my suspicions and either prove my anecdotal information right or wrong.

After digging through my inbox, sent items, LinkedIn mailbox and notes I created a new spreadsheet. I set it up by Company Name, Position Title, Phone Interview, In-House Interview, Source, Status and Reason. Nothing scientific or fancy but something to give me a solid picture of my activity. I decided to limit the spreadsheet to only those companies or third party recruiters (TPR’s) where I had submitted my resume and not count the number of people I had sent my resume to help network me around (that number is in the neighborhood of 50).

Here is what I learned:

Since January 19th when my position was eliminated my resume has been submitted 36 times. There are three main sources: Directly Applied*, Contacted by the company or TPR, and Referral. Out of the these 36 I have had 14 phone interviews. (I am only counting one phone interview per job per employer. In some cases I have had multiple phone interviews with one employer for a role).

Directly Applied – 14 submissions resulting 2 phone interviews or 14%
Contacted by a company or TPR – 9 submissions resulting in 4 phone interviews or 44%
Referral – 13 submissions resulting in 8 phone interviews or 62%

*I had researched the companies before applying and in some cases found employees that were first or second level LinkedIn contacts and sent them a note or had a phone conversation. None of these attempts led to a phone interview or “advantage”. In other cases I did not find any contacts but based on my research submitted my resume.

Out of the 14 phone interviews I have been invited for an in-house interview twice and I am expecting to hear on three more phone interviews. If those hit then the low percentage should quickly jump to a more respectable number.

The conclusion from my unscientific research (but personal experience) appears that I should focus my efforts on being referred instead of directly applying or waiting to be contacted. However, just like in recruiting, I do not rely on one source or approach in finding candidates. In addition, the three opportunities I am waiting to hear on consist of one referral, one direct apply and one where I was contacted. So if I only focus on being referred then I would be down at least six phone interviews and waiting to hear on one opportunity – not three.

By doing this exercise I learned that I have a fairly balanced approach to my search, each method resulted in activity and only one company where I had a phone interview never provided an update. I also confirmed what I suspected: using multiple communication tools – email, social media, phone, and in person networking – will spread the net as far and wide as possible creating leads. Having a balanced and methodical approach whether in recruiting or in a job search will help me move forward along with whatever organization I join.

I welcome your thoughts.

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7 Comments

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7 responses to “My Personal Job Search Stats

  1. Good stuff here Mark. I’m wishing you the best in your search.

  2. Mark, you are such a good example of how to manage a search. Most people don’t have your analytical recruiting background and most of these details remain as you say, anecdotal at best. Whoever lands you wins the talent acquisition lotto, my friend.

    ~BC

  3. Dorothy Beach

    Nice analysis but you did not include anything related to F2F networking events and if they produced leads. Can I assume you are doing that?

    • Dorothy,

      Yes, I am doing F2F networking events and individual meetings with contacts. Some of those have led to being referred to an organization. I believe this avenue along with others is a necessary part of a well balanced job search strategy.

      Thanks for the comment and reading the blog.

      Mark

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